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Truck Accident Multimillion-Dollar Settlement.

"M.A.," a 30-year-old man, was driving to work in New Mexico. Suddenly a commercial truck veered across the center line and struck his vehicle head on. M.A. died at the scene. The McNeely Stephenson firm was hired shortly after the crash to represent the family of the deceased.

our client results

Vacationing in a motorhome or recreational vehicle has become increasingly popular. Whether for reasons of comfort or economy, Americans take to the highways in RVs for days, weeks or even months at a time. It’s not unusual to see an RV or camper bearing dozens of decals, each representing a past destination for the travelers. From coast to coast, Americans are seeing the U.S.A. at their own pace and from their own home-on-wheels.

RV Motorhome Crashes

The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association says about 9 million households own an RV. On rural roads, interstate highways and bustling city streets, they share the road with much smaller cars, SUVs and pickup trucks. Their size and lack of maneuverability can make them hazardous, as can their unskilled drivers.

The Indiana RV accident lawyers of McNeely Stephenson have helped many families who were victims of motor vehicle accidents. We have been successfully litigating personal injury cases across Indiana since 1982, putting our experience and abilities to work advocating for the rights of injured Hoosiers from Elkhart County (where more than 60% of RVs are made) to Posey, from Vermilion to Wayne. Call 855-206-2555 today to schedule a free consultation about your motorhome accident.

Types of Recreational Vehicles on Indiana Roads

Recreational vehicles come in all shapes, sizes and price ranges. They are generally classified as follows:

  • Class B motorhomes, also commonly referred to as van conversions, are the smallest fully enclosed motorhomes. They generally weigh 6,000 to 8,000 pounds, are 17 to 19 feet in length, and are easier to handle than larger models.
  • Class C motorhomes range in weight from 10,000 to 12,000 pounds and stretch from 20 feet to 31 feet in length, usually with a sleeping bunk over the cab as well as a bedroom and kitchen in the rear of the unit. Many have slideouts to extend the living space when parked.
  • Class A motorhomes are the largest, most luxurious RVs on the road. Often built on a bus or truck chassis, they can be up to 45 feet long and 8.5 feet wide. At the touch of a button, Class A motorhome owners can extend their unit’s exterior walls outward to add additional living space.

Common Causes of RV Accidents

Some motorhomes are as long as a truck, requiring skills and precautions not typical of passenger vehicles. Nevertheless, unlike drivers of buses or tractor trailers, drivers of RVs do not have to obtain a commercial driver’s license. Anyone with a regular driver’s license can get behind the wheel of a motorhome, and some cause accidents because they make one of these common mistakes:

  • Taking a turn too fast
  • Making a turn too tightly
  • Underestimating the distance needed to bring the RV to a stop
  • Failing to see other vehicles because of the RV’s large blind spot
  • Improperly securing items being towed behind the RV
  • Overloading the motorhome.

In addition to driver error, certain characteristics of motorhomes themselves can contribute to the likelihood of an accident:

  • Tires. Because it is common for RVs to be parked for long periods of time between trips, their tires may suffer sidewall deterioration, or dry rot. This condition, combined with the heavy load motorhome tires must carry, can cause tire failure on the road and an accident with serious consequences. Even if the vehicle’s tires are in good condition, under-inflation can cause RV tire failure.
  • Tendency to tip over. With their tall, narrow profile, RVs are more likely than other vehicles to roll over if the driver swerves to avoid a road hazard or inexpertly negotiates a curve.
  • Sway. Very often, vacationers choose to tow a passenger vehicle behind their motorhome for getting around after they set up at the campground. Problems with the hitch can create a sway that endangers the RV occupants as well as others on the road.

real-life cases

“B.K.” was driving on a two-lane road one Sunday afternoon with his mother in the front seat and his brother and sister-in-law in the back seat when his life was forever changed. B.K. was struck head on by D.C.

D.C. had spent the day drinking with a friend and had stopped at a restaurant less than five miles from the point of the accident where D.C. had been served several drinks. D.C.’s blood alcohol level was more than twice the legal limit.

As a result of the terrible wreck, B.K. received devastating injuries, which included multiple broken bones, facial fractures, and loss of vision. B.K.’s mother, brother, and sister-in-law were all killed in the accident.

As one would anticipate, D.C. had virtually no insurance. Stephenson, through his thorough and detailed investigation, was able to prepare claims against the restaurant and those that provided the alcohol.

Stephenson pursued dram shop claims against those responsible CASE SUMMARY

D.H. was a competitive bicyclist who was riding in preparation for a cross-country fundraising ride. In the spring of 2010, D.H. was riding across an old steel-grated deck bridge in Shelby County when he hit a hole in the bridge and flipped over the handlebars of his bike. The impact to the bridge decking caused severe injuries to his face, teeth, tongue, and elbow.

Through the investigation, they were able to learn as early as 1998, the bridge inspection reports showed the bridge in question needed to be replaced. The county never authorized additional inspections. The county obtained $844,000 in funding for the replacement of the bridge in 2000, but the Historical Society and adjacent property owners wanted the bridge repaired rather than replaced.

This crash could have been avoided if the inspectors and county had done their jobs. CASE SUMMARY

Our client (“D.W.”) was a front-seat passenger in a vehicle that was struck by a UDF truck making deliveries. D.W. received broken arms and legs, as well as internal injuries. Stephenson was retained by D.W.’s personal counsel to prepare and try the case. Discovery determined that the UDF driver had multiple driving violations. Stephenson retained numerous experts to show the jury the devastating effects of the injuries. Before trial, the defendant’s company stated that a jury in a small southern county in Indiana would never return a verdict for $1 million in this case.

The defendant was correct; the verdict was twice that amount. CASE SUMMARY

Help after an Indiana RV accident.

The experienced accident lawyers of McNeely Stephenson, an Indianapolis law firm focusing on personal injury law, can help you obtain compensation from a negligent driver who caused a motorhome to crash. Whether you were a passenger in the motorhome or were in another vehicle sharing the road with it, we will analyze the circumstances of the accident and identify all sources of possible compensation. Insurance companies often don’t make things easy on accident victims. McNeely Stephenson will shoulder this burden for you and negotiate the most favorable settlement possible. You won’t owe our firm anything until we successfully obtain money on your behalf. Use our online contact form or call us toll free at 855-206-2555.

Personal Injury Lawyer
March 9, 2018 / Vehicle Accidents
PERCLOS: The Newest Way to Detect Drowsy Drivers

How many times have you seen a weaving car on the road and wondered, is that driver under the influence? Did you ever consider that they might be sleepy and not drunk? It turns out that drowsy driving is a much bigger problem than the official statistics would lead you to believe. The U.S. government’s figures have traditionally pegged drowsy driving as responsible for, at most, 2 percent of all crashes. But a new study using the PERCLOS m...


Mike Stephenson is a Super Lawyer in Indiana along with many of his peers at McNeely Stephenson. This is one of the highest honors an attorney can achieve


The AV Preeminent Rating from Martindale Hubbell is the HIGHEST RATING and considered a significant accomplishment. It is a peer-reviewed process reflecting that other attorneys rank Mike Stephenson at the highest possible level of professional excellence.


Attorney Mike Stephenson is a proud member of The Litigation Counsel of America’s Honorary Society. A close-knit, peer-selected, and aggressively diverse honorary society of 3,500 of the “best trial lawyers” in the country. Less than one-half of one percent of American lawyers, vigorously vetted for skills, expertise, and service; an invitation-only collegial network.


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Our attorneys are proven advocates and trial attorneys. They have served as lead trial counsel in more than 100 civil jury trials, and have handled litigation in 18 states