DWS (Driving While Sleepy)


August 5, 2015 / Vehicle Accidents

As drivers, we’ve all felt the heaviness in our eyelids that means, “pull over,” and perhaps even scared ourselves because of an unintentional drift in our steering path.

Drowsy driving is no small problem: In the U.S. every day, a quarter-million folks fall asleep at the wheel, according to the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School. “Driving while sleepy” in the U.S factors into more than 100,000 crashes annually, with 1,500 deaths and 40,000 injuries. An astonishing 23 percent of adults have fallen asleep while driving, according to a 1998 survey.

But legal drugs are making the situation worse.

Asleep at the Wheel

An increase in car accidents has become associated with three prescription sleeping aids: temazepam (Restoril), zolpidem (Ambien, Ambien CR) and trazodone (Desyrel). This, according to a University of Washington School of Pharmacy and the Group Health Research Institute study, which was published in the American Journal of Public Health. Ambien and Ambien CR users should be especially concerned, because they are more than twice as likely to have an accident, as compared to non-drug-users.

If you take any of these drugs, especially if you are a new user of them, you should be worried. Taking these sleep-aiding drugs can potentially double your risk of a vehicular accident, even after the side effects have faded. Your risk is the same as having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level from 0.06 to 0.11 percent. Keep in mind that the threshold for being legally drunk in all 50 states is 0.08 percent!

While it is true that, if the pills are used routinely, the “hangover effect” often wears off (speculation is that people adjust or learn to compensate for the effects), these drugs are slow to leave the body. Because of this fact, the FDA has required women to take lower dosages (because women’s’ bodies process the drugs more slowly), and has strongly recommended that men take lower dosages as well.

Non-Drug Fixes for Insomnia

The first line of treatment for insomnia is generally not drug-based, but is instead something called cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). CBT involves talk therapy combined with behavioral changes that help your brain and body learn to sleep correctly again.

“There are many approaches to the management of insomnia, including lifestyle changes such as cutting caffeine intake and exercising, which may alleviate the insomnia without medications,” Ryan Hansen, UW assistant professor of pharmacy, said. “There’s a public safety concern that we want health providers and the general public to be aware of.”

If you take any of the drugs mentioned in this study, or often take any drug to help you sleep, you might want to consider alternative forms of therapy. Your risk of an accident when you are “driving while sleepy” is significant.

Successfully litigating personal injury cases in Indiana since 1981.

Have you or a loved one been injured in a car accident where the other driver was under the influence of legal, prescribed drugs? If you think you might have a case, keep in mind that in Indiana there is a statute of limitations – or a deadline – for filing personal injury claims, so it is unwise to delay. If you were injured as a result of someone else’s negligence, you deserve compensation. Don’t lose the opportunity to obtain the money you need to put your life back on track and to make your family’s future financially secure. Call Mike Stephenson at 1-317-825-5200 or contact us for immediate help. Stephenson Rife: We believe justice matters.

Attorney Mike Stephenson

Attorney Mike StephensonMike Stephenson has 40 years of experience and is a trusted advisor to many individuals and companies. His current practice is dominated by civil litigation in state and federal courts. He focuses much of his time on handling catastrophic injuries caused by all types of accidents, including motor vehicle, trucking, workplace injuries, product liability, and fire, just to name a few. He also works extensively in construction accidents. [ Attorney Bio ]

Featured Posts

  • What to Do if Your Motorcycle Is Hit by a Car from BehindWhat to Do if Your Motorcycle Is Hit by a Car from Behind
    In Vehicle Accidents
    The average motorcycle weighs just 700 pounds, and when one collides with a much heavier truck or car, the consequences can be severe. Motorcycle accidents are often deadly. You may be asking what to do if your motorcycle is hit by a car from behind. Are there certain steps you should take to ensure your immediate safety? Let’s take a closer look at motorcycle crashes. There were 8,596,314 motorcycles registered in the U.S. in 2019, […]
  • Can I Sue for a Concussion?Can I Sue for a Concussion?
    In Personal Injury
    You’ve received a blow to the head that resulted in an injury and left you with medical bills you didn’t expect to deal with. Now you’re asking, “Can I sue for a concussion?” The answer to the question is yes, you can sue for damages provided you can show proof of injury and that the blow to your head was the result of negligence, even if the concussion was mild. A concussion is caused by a blow to the […]
  • How Often Do Car Accident Cases Go to CourtHow Often Do Car Accident Cases Go to Court?
    In Car Accidents
    About every 10 seconds someone is injured in a motor vehicle accident in the United States, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). This means a lot of motorists are getting hurt every day. While there are no exact figures available, the majority of car accident lawsuits – an estimated 95% — are settled before trial. So, if you’re asking how often do car accident cases go to court, the answer is […]

Archives